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Magnetism

This can occur when a watch is subjected to a magnetic field. A magnetic field can emate from a variety of different sources in day to day life. Computer hard drives, medical equipment, large speaker systems, refrigerator doors, magnetic tablet cases, mobile phones, magnetic catches on handbags to name a few can all emit magnetic fields. Magnetism may lead to excessive rate gain which can cause a watch to run fast or stop entirely.  Magnetic fields do not cause permanent damage and minor intervention only is required to return your Bremont to it’s usual excellent standard.

Mechanical watches

Watches that are powered by a mainspring whereby the oscillating system runs purely on a mechanical basis, e.g. balance or pendulum.

Mohs hardness scale

This scale was devised to divide the whole spectrum of harness using a scale of 1 to 10. “1” stands for a very soft material (talcum) and “10” for the hardest material (diamond).

Power reserve

The maximum amount of time over which a mechanical movement can continue to run after its mainspring has been fully wound.

Retrograde

“Retrograde” is featured on the Bremont Victory and sweeps a segment of a circle before springing back to the initial position to begin the movement again.

Abraham-Louis Breguet used this type of retrograde mechanism in the late eighteenth century for functions such as the date or an equation of time. The Bremont Victory includes this complication and provides an aesthetically pleasing feature to any watch enthusiast.

Roto-Click®

Patented rotating bi-directional Roto-Click® inner bezel is an innovatively engineered ball-locking system containing a number of ball bearings that positions the bezel accurately for improved visibility.

Rotor

The oscillating mass which moves and turns freely about its axis in an automatic watch. The rotor winds up the mainspring as it swings. A clutch prevents the rotor from over-winding the mainspring

Sapphire crystal

Sapphire crystal is the favoured material for watch crystal due to its exceptional hardness (9 on the Mohs scale). Using sapphire crystal is far more expensive to manufacture than mineral or acrylic crystals, however sapphire crystal glass provides excellent scratch resistant properties.

Shock absorption

A system used to protect the very fragile pivots of the balance staff against breakage. The jewels for the pivots of the balance staff are elastically fitted to the main plate. In response to a severe shock, they give first. A watch with shock absorption properties should be able to meet the demands of DIN 8308-A. The testing includes the watch being hit by a hammer at 4.4m/s (equivalent of the watch being dropped from a one metre height onto a solid wooden floor). The watch must then not show a rate of deviation of more than +/- 60 seconds a day.

Stainless steel

An alloy of steel, nickel and chrome provides longevity and is extremely hard-wearing along with being favourable to the wearer.