MBII White

POA

    Description

    Tested and designed in conjunction with the iconic British aviation company ‘Martin-Baker’, the MBII White offers a fresh and striking new look providing further choice to the classic collection. The new model features the distinctive knurled effect on the aluminium barrel inspired by components on the ejection seats themselves and is available in orange, blue, green and anthracite. Equally the yellow and black loop at the end of the second hand is a direct reference to the ejection pull handle. The MBII White very much retains the classic DNA that has made the MB a must-have for any serious collector. It has been put through the same intensive, extensive testing schedule that the ejection seats go through including live ejection, vibration, temperature extremes and salt fog.

    BE-36AE automatic chronometer with 38-hour power reserve
    43mm hardened stainless steel Trip-Tick® case construction
    Anti-magnetic Faraday cage and anti-shock movement mount
    Water resistant to 10 ATM, 100 metres
    Black leather strap and additional Temple Island strap

    Bremont Chronometers Watches | Mens | MB | ARCHIVE MBII White

    tested beyond endurance

    Including Live Ejection and MFOS Crashworthy Testing, Extreme Temperature Endurance, Vibration, Altitude Testing and Aircraft Carrier Deck Testing

    British Made

    REINVIGORATING THE BRITISH WATCH INDUSTRY

    It is not completely unexpected to find that the world sets its time by Greenwich and not by Geneva. Whilst Geneva and Switzerland may be producing the vast majority of luxury wristwatches today, this certainly wasn’t always the case. In 1800 half of the world's watches, around 200,000 pieces a year, were produced on British shores by British watchmakers, which is an incredible statistic. Another wonderful statistic is that probably over 60-70% of the innovation in a modern day mechanical watch has come from Britain, including every major escapement design. Bremont's mission has always been to play a part in bringing back watchmaking to British shores.

    The Full story